Advanced Air

The Cost to Replace an Evaporator Coil in a Central AC

February 19, 2015

To buy and install a new evaporator coil can cost $900-$1800+.

Why such a wide variation of cost?

The cost changes depending on a few factors:

  1. Your parts warranty
  2. The size of your air conditioner system
  3. The installer’s pricing

1) Your parts warranty

Many AC manufacturers offer a 10-year parts warranty. If yours has expired—or has become void due to lack of maintenance—you’ll have to pay the cost of the part plus the installation.

Don’t assume the contractor will check the warranty of your air conditioner. Contact the manufacturer to see if your equipment is still within the warranty period.

To do this, call the manufacturer's customer support number with the model number and serial number.

If your unit is still under warranty, tell your contractor. Otherwise, you may pay full cost for the evaporator coil even though you could have gotten it for free.

2) The size of the AC system

Central AC systems come in various sizes, between 1.5 to 5 tons.  The larger the system, the most expensive the coil—and installation.

3) The installer’s pricing

Every central air conditioner installer prices differently.

Some bill you hourly, so you won’t know the ACTUAL cost until the work is done. We say “actual” cost because they’ll give you an estimate upfront, but the final cost may vary.

Billing hourly can create a conflict of interest. If the installer works slower, it rewards him or her—and punishes you.

Other contractors give you upfront pricing, meaning that you’ll know the exact cost before any work begins. We use the upfront pricing model.

Contact us to see the cost to replace your evaporator coil.

Caution: You may want to replace the outdoor unit, too

While your main problem right now is the evaporator coil, you may also want to consider replacing the outside (condenser) unit to have a “matched system.

Why is having a matched system important?

According to the Air-Conditioning, Heating and refrigeration institute (AHRI):

1)  “Improperly matched indoor and outdoor units can create undue stress on your cooling system, resulting in an unnecessary, premature failure.”

2) The new evaporator coil won’t work as efficiently as advertised because it’s working with an older condenser unit.

3) The inside and outside coils must use the same type of refrigerant. So if your AC system uses the older R-22 refrigerant, your new evaporator coil must also use it to work with your older condenser unit.

ProblemR-22 is being phased out, making it more expensive as time goes on. Replacing the entire system let’s you switch to R-401a, the newer, more widely available refrigerant.

So if you have an older system (10+ years) that uses R-22 refrigerant, you should consider replacing the entire system.

Want more professional advice? If you live in the Fort Myers, FL area, contact Advanced Air for help.